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  • Why Dirty Chimneys Cause House Fires

    Why Dirty Chimneys Cause House Fires

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    As the winter continues to drudge on along with it comes those terrifying news stories of house fires caused by a dirty chimney.  Why does this happen and how can we prevent it?  In this article, we will inform you of the reasons why a creosote-filled chimney leads to deadly fires and how you can keep your family safe from them.Fire Damage

    When using your fireplace, by-products are created through the combustion process.  These by-products include smoke, tar, unburned wood particles, etc.  When this debris flies up into the cooler chimney condensation occurs creating a residue called creosote that sticks to the wall’s surfaces.  Creosote is highly combustible and dangerous when left unaddressed.  If it becomes too thick and internal flue temperatures get high enough, the result could be a fire within the chimney flue.

    One of the best defenses to prevent a house fire from occuring in your home is by regularly having your chimney swept and cleaned by a professional.   This process only takes about an hour to complete and can be done during any time of the year — even Winter.   The technician will brush the creosote and other buildup from the walls while also inspecting the flue for any major defects. 

    If you can’t remember the last time you had your chimney swept now is the time to schedule one.  At Lindemann Chimney Service, we specialize in offering our customers certified, thorough chimney sweeps.  When using our sweep service, you will receive a level one inspection along with a video scan of your flue.  We always do our best to make sure your unit is safe to use before we leave.  If we can’t remedy all the problems at that time, our technician will inform you of the best next step.  Contact us today to schedule an appointment.

    Contact us for more information or to schedule an appointment.

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